December Baby – 23 months

Little guy,

I know I say this every month, but it’s crazy how fast this year has gone. I came across a photo from last Halloween the other day, and you have grown up so much since then! You are louder, and into EVERYTHING! You and your big brother love to play together (as long as neither one of you is touching the other’s toys…”MINE!”)

Earlier this month, you started sitting on the potty (all on your own), so it was time to say goodbye to our cloth diapers. Though potty training is a lot of work, I’m not terribly sad about leaving the diaper phase behind. hahaha

You’re such a big boy now, and I’m excited for your second birthday!

Love you lots and lots!
~ Mommy

23 month milestones (from Baby Center):

Mastered Skills (most kids can do)

  • Can make a tower of four bricks – Yes
  • Can name a simple picture in a book – Yep
  • Can use 50 single words – Almost

Emerging Skills (half of kids can do)

  • Can make two or three word sentences – “I go!”
  • Can sing simple tunes – Not yet
  • Takes more of an interest in playing with other children – Not really

Advanced Skills (a few kids can do)

  • Talks about self (likes, dislikes) – Nope
  • Asks “Why?” – Not yet

December Baby – 22 months

Hey, little guy!

I can’t believe in 2 months, you will be TWO years old! Your new favorite word is “mine!”, and the tantrums are starting. Fun times!

Aside from those moments, you are so cute! You climb EVERYTHING, and you love to explore. We went to see Curious George (still your favorite) at a local daycare, and you preferred checking out all the cool toys in the classrooms to doing any of the scheduled activites. lol We also went on a family beach trip, and you had a blast playing in the ocean!

I love you so much!

– Mommy

22 month milestones (from Baby Center):

Mastered Skills (most kids can do)

  • Can kick a ball forward – He can, but he’s much better at throwing.
  • Follows two-step requests (get your doll and bring it here) – Yes
  • Imitates others’ behavior – Definitely

Emerging Skills (half of kids can do)

  • Can do simple puzzles – Yes
  • Can draw a straight line – Not really
  • Can identify several body parts – We’re working on it

Advanced Skills (a few kids can do)

  • Can put on clothing – Not yet
  • Might be ready for a big bed – No way! He’s staying in the crib where he can’t destroy things! lol
  • Understands opposites (tall and short) – Nope

December Baby – 21 months

Little Man –

This is such a fun age! Every day you are learning new things. You’re not as verbal as your older brother was at this age, but you understand a lot, and you follow directions really well. You love to sweep and open the dishwasher (usually in the middle of a cycle). You will now show me something and say “See?” and when you want to go outside, you’ll bring me your shoes (or my shoes) and say “I go go!”

I love you so much!

~ Mommy

21 month milestones (from Baby Center):

Mastered Skills (most kids can do)

  • Can walk up steps- Yes
  • Enjoys helping around the house – Yes, especially sweeping
  • Can set simple goals (e.g. deciding to put a toy in a certain place) – Yep

Emerging Skills (half of kids can do)

  • Can throw a ball overhand – Been there, done that!
  • Can kick a ball forward – Yes
  • Can make building brick towers/stack blocks – Yep

Advanced Skills (a few kids can do)

  • Names simple pictures in a book (ie: dog, cat) – Not yet
  • Can make short sentences (ie: “Me go”) – Only “I go go”, so far.
  • Can walk down stairs – He’s getting the hang of it.

December Baby – 20 months

Happy 20 months, little man!

This month’s highlights:

  • You’ve added 7 words/phrases consistently to your vocabulary! (“here it is”, “Wow!”, “What?”, “Yes”, “Cheese”, “Ow”, “Car”)
  • We went to the Children’s Museum, and you spend the majority of the time in the little grocery store, putting things in a basket and taking them back out. It was so cute! 🙂
  • You love to copy your big brother, and follow him everywhere. (He’s not a huge fan of that…)
  • Your new favorite toy is a remote control car that plays the most annoying music, so sometimes I have to hide it from you. Which is probably why you started saying “car”…hahaha

I love you!

~ Mommy 

20 month milestones (from Baby Center):

Mastered Skills (most kids can do)

  • Feeds doll – I’ve never seen him do this, but he doesn’t actually have a doll.
  • Takes off own clothes – He can take of his shoes, and attempts to take his shirt off, but hasn’t done it successfully yet.
  • Dumps an object in imitation, such as throwing garbage away – Yep

Emerging Skills (half of kids can do)

  • Learns words at a rate of ten or more a day – He’s started saying a lot more lately, and understands very well, so yes.
  • Can walk up stairs (but probably not down) – Yep, and he’s getting the hang of walking down them, too.

Advanced Skills (a few kids can do)

  • May start exploring genitals – He’s a boy…enough said!  lol
  • Draws a straight line – Not really
  • Names several body parts – Just eyes and ears, so far.

December Baby – 19 months

Dear sweet boy –

Happy 19 months!

You’ve become quite a handful this month. You LOVE to go outside (never mind that it’s really hot!), and throw tennis balls for the dog to fetch. You haven’t added any words to your vocabulary that I know of, because all you say (or scream) now is “NO!” and point your finger at me. Hahaha Speaking of screaming, there’s a lot of that, too. Not always in anger, more in a “let me show you how loud I can be!” way. Between you and your big brother (who never stops talking), it’s loud here. All day long.

I love you,
Mommy

19 month milestones (from Baby Center):

Mastered Skills (most kids can do)

  • Uses a spoon and fork – Yes
  • Runs – Definitely
  • Throws a ball underhand – No, but he throws really well overhand!
  • Enjoys helping around the house – Yep

Emerging Skills (half of kids can do)

  • Understands as many as 200 words – maybe?
  • Recognizes when something is wrong (e.g., calling a dog a cat) – Not yet

Advanced Skills (a few kids can do)

  • Washes and dries own hands with help – Yes, he loves to wash his hands!
  • Points to picture or object when you call it by name – Not yet
  • May know when he needs to pee – Nope

5 Steps to Creating a Culture of Self-Reliance in Your Family

The following is a guest post.  No compensation was received.

When you have a family, you always strive to teach them something good and invaluable. Our grandparents have done that with our parents, our parents have done that with us. Now, it is our turn. It is important for us to enable our children to be self-reliable from the early age. Here is how you can teach your children some basic steps that will lead them through life later on.

Learn how to save money

First things first, money is important for every person in the world and who says differently isn’t telling the truth. The money provides stability and security. Making your own money automatically means that you are an independent person and that you can rely on yourself, which is actually something we all want in our lives. If you impose such a system in your house within your family members, the odds that your child will be aware of the fact that money can be very important are very high. At children’s early age, you can provide them with some allowance and advise them to keep that money so they can buy a toy or some candies later. Advise them that saving money will enable them to spend it on stuff they really want. Tell them a story of how have you been saving money so you could afford a house or a journey to a seaside. Have your child sit next to you when you count how much money you need to pay the bills and let it go with you to pay those. Some numbers will be too large for the child to understand them, but it will realize that it is a serious thing.

Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without

And by ”it” we mean clothing, toys, gadgets and even food. It is very important that you advise your family that they shouldn’t change their clothing after only a month of wearing it. They shouldn’t crave for new Ipad when they have sufficient toys and other gadgets. They shouldn’t throw away food they don’t eat. Being self-reliant means that you are able to know when it’s time for changes or new things. Teach them to wear the clothes until they are unable to fit it. Teach them that they should save food if they cannot eat everything. Try to make them to fix thing when they are broken. They will appreciate it more.

What are you going to be when you grow up?

This question is important because it imposes many others. You need to explain to your child the fact that people work for money, but that we also want to do something we like. Try to make the child feel positive about work, job generally and earning.

Ask a child what it would like to be when it grows up and draw that dream job. After that, draw yourself at work (you do not have to do a masterpiece) and explain to the child what do you do, why you have chosen it and why you love your job. You can do this with many occupations. In this way, children will be taught values regarding hardworking and obligations. It is proven that children who work over summer holidays have strong communicative skills and are easily adjusted to jobs later.

Maintaining the house

Starting from their rooms, they have to learn that there should be no one picking up after them. They need to know that it is important to have some responsibility at home, as well as in the schools, colleges, or at work. If they learn to be tidy and neat, those characteristics will help them later in the life. People notice such things and praise people for that. You can start at the early age of your children. Advise them that their rooms need to be tidy. At first you can start with rewards, such as giving them candies if they do it. But rest assured that later it will become their habit. Once they are to go to a college, they will be ready to live alone with no one to help them clean the apartment.

Exercising and healthy food

These two will help everyone become self-confident. If we feel good and healthy, then there is nothing to stop us and it boosts our ego. You can start by explaining how important is to eat healthy food and have some exercising. Also, if you do it, everyone else will in the family. Besides, children always seek for their role models. You can be theirs.

If you start implementing these things, your children will grow up into self-reliable people, and sometimes that is actually what we all want. They will be thankful, rest assured. 

 

About the Author:

Healthy living and wellbeing have always been Harris’s main occupation. He’s a certified yoga instructor and in the last ten years, he’s taken up hiking and trekking as a way of taking care of his physical fitness and inner peace. He shares his experiences and advice on http://www.prosurvivalist.com/ as one of its revered writers.

 

December Baby – 18 months

Sweet boy,

It’s hard to believe you are halfway to 2 years old!  

Lots of learning going on around here!  You figured out how to ride the ride-on toys, and you zoom all over the house!  You learned a new sign, “bath”.  When I ask “where’s your belly button?”, you lift up your shirt.  And, you’ve added a few new words to your vocabulary.  

I love you!
Mommy

Current stats:

Weight: 28 lbs. 7 oz.
Height: 33.75 in.

Pants: 18 months
Shirts: 18 months
Shoes: size 6
Diapers: size 5
Teeth: still 12, I think?

Foods:
Likes – almost everything lol
Dislikes – green beans

18 month milestones (from Baby Center):

Mastered Skills (most kids can do)

  • Will “read” board books on his own – Yep
  • Scribbles well – Yes

Emerging Skills (half of kids can do)

  • Strings two words together in phrases – “Uh oh”, “thank you”, “hi dada”
  • Brushes teeth with help – Yes
  • Stacks four blocks – Been there, done that

Advanced Skills (a few kids can do)

  • Throws a ball overhand – Been there, done that
  • Takes toys apart and puts them back together – Yep
  • Shows signs of toilet training readiness – He’ll point to his diaper sometimes when he’s wet.

December Baby – 17 months

Happy 17 months, sweet boy!

This month was a big one on the language front. You’ve added a few more actual words to your vocabulary, and can now say “bye” and wave. You can understand simple directions, and follow them. You point to your nose when asked, and you love to high-five! It’s so cute!


I love you!
Mommy

17 month milestones (from Baby Center):

Mastered Skills (most kids can do)

  • Uses six words regularly – Yes – “mama”, “dada”, “hello”, “bye”, “no”, “go”…
  • Enjoys pretend games – Yep
  • Likes riding toys – He can sit on them, but hasn’t quite figured out how to make them go…

Emerging Skills (half of kids can do)

  • Feeds doll – Nope
  • Speaks more clearly – He’s getting there.
  • Throws a ball underhand – I haven’t seen him do this, but he throws overhand really well.

Advanced Skills (a few kids can do)

  • Dances to music – Yes
  • Sorts toys by color, shape, or size – Not yet
  • Kicks ball forward – Maybe once or twice? He prefers throwing them. Lol
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