How do I know if my crib has been recalled?

How do you check if a product has been recalled?

Before you buy a product, especially for a child, find out if the manufacturer has recalled it. Visit these websites to find the latest on safety recalls: Recalls.gov lists recalls from federal agencies. Sign up for free email notifications on recalls.

Are all drop-side cribs recalled?

Numerous Recalls

The CPSC’s board voted unanimously to ban the drop-side cribs, which have been under scrutiny for many years. They have always been popular because the drop-side moves up and down and allows parents to lift infants from the cribs with ease.

Is it illegal to sell drop-side cribs?

Today, it’s illegal to use or sell drop-side cribs — either new or secondhand. They’re also not permitted for use in business or community settings, even if they have been equipped with immobilizing hardware meant to stop the sliding functionality.

Do baby cribs expire?

Although cribs don’t technically expire (unlike car seats, which have an expiration date printed on them, according to Parenting), safety regulations do change and recalls occasionally happen, as well. … These updated rules prohibited the sale of any cribs with a side that drops down.

IMPORTANT:  What can cause UTI in toddlers?

Where can I find recall information?

Recalls.gov. To provide better service in alerting the American people to unsafe, hazardous or defective products, six federal agencies with vastly different jurisdictions have joined together to create www.recalls.gov — a “one stop shop” for U.S. Government recalls.

Where can I get baby stuff recalled?

Reduce and recycle

TerraCycle offers recycling programs for baby gear, toys, art supplies, and more.

How many babies have died from drop side cribs?

CPSC staff is aware of 32 infant and toddler suffocation and strangulation deaths and hundreds of incidents that were caused by or related to drop-side detachments in cribs made by various manufacturers. Homemade repairs to cribs like this one can be deadly.

Is a crib from 1990 Safe?

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommends against using a secondhand crib. If you do, they recommend not using a crib that is more than 10 years old. … Also, cribs that have been assembled, disassembled and reassembled over time may have worn out hardware, which can loosen, making the crib unsafe.

What can I do with my old drop side crib?

Answer: Assuming you have access to a city or county dump (you did not provide an address in your question), you should dispose of the crib there, said a spokeswoman for the Consumer Product Safety Commission. “It should be disassembled at the time,” she emphasized.

How do I get rid of my old crib?

If you don’t have the time to take your crib to a donation center yourself or are unsure if they will take your old crib, just call on the baby gear recycling pros at LoadUp. With eco-friendly disposal alternatives to the landfill, we always try to donate as much of your used nursery furniture as possible to charities.

IMPORTANT:  How do you know if your child has comprehension problems?

Can cribs be donated?

You can donate a used crib, but it needs to be one that is safety compliant.

Is a 10 year old crib safe?

Do not use cribs older than 10 years or broken or modified cribs. Infants can strangle to death if their bodies pass through gaps between loose components or broken slats while their heads remain entrapped. … Never place a crib near a window with blind, curtain cords or baby monitor cords; babies can strangle on cords.

Can you use a second hand crib?

If possible, avoid buying or accepting a used secondhand crib. While someone offering you a crib is generous and well-meaning, it may not be the best option for the safety of your child. The simple truth is that a used crib can be hazardous. Older cribs might not comply with current safety regulations.

What are safety standards for cribs?

No more than 2 3/8 inches (about the width of a soda can) between crib slats so a baby’s body cannot fit through the slats; no missing or cracked slats. No corner posts over 1/16th inch high so a baby’s clothing cannot catch. No cutouts in the headboard or foot board so a baby’s head cannot get trapped.